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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the national museum of scotland. it's opening its doors tomorrow and our scotland correspondent has gone to have a look. >> this is a story of a restless people and a restless nation. scotland's heritage of inventi and discovery put this small country on the map. the power of the steam engine revolutionized industry. the television changed the lives of millions. and scots sent back structures from afar. >> scots were great inventors and explore rers and colonial explorers were missionaries. in many ways the stories we tell here are in part the story of scotland's engagement with the rest of the world. >> there are much older tales like t-rex and the national history gallery. in here there are stories of survival and some of the exhibits themselves have survived for decade in the freezer. some date back to the 19th century. now they're being used again to teach the theory of evolution. charles darwin once lived on the site of the museum. he was just a student in scotland but this man's discovery for discoverying penicillin is a gem in they can electic museum. >> we have a chance to bring
broadcasting. a scandal that scotland yard now says may have targeted as many as 4,000 people. nbc's stephanie goss is in london for an update on moisture dough dock. >> the british public is looking for answers. the head of newscorp corporation rupert murdock, his son, james, and rebecca brooks have been asked to testify next week in front of a parliament. in an interview on the bbc, former prime minister gordon brown accused news international of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find that this happened. because of the links with criminals. >> in 2006, a murdock paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son had cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information. but a statement from news indianaer national says the story ran from a member of the public whose family has also experienced cystic fibrosis. also on the defensive, investigators from scotland yard who face accusations that police accepted bribees from reporters. >> an organization of 50,000 people, we ha
. >> big deal. who cares if the head of scotland yard resigns. why is scotland yard policing england anyway? call me when the head of england yard resigns nap's news. >> time for your political ticker with tim farley. listen, i want to show you a poll. as the clock ticks -- as we get closer to that deadline for the debt ceiling, a new cbs poll shows that 46% say that the debt ceiling should be raised. compared to 24% in june. 49% shouldn't compared to 69% in june. the president has asked for a deal to get done by friday. what is your sense of it? >> sense right now is that -- something. it closer to the mitch mcconnell solution. which would involve a less con view lated series of events. the president vie toting the house and senate. i think that's the direction we're heading. some things in there about cuts. we'll have to wait and see. i hi we'll know by friday where we are going on this, finally. >> a couple of distractions. one is news corporation. people are paying attention to thatpy understand both martin sheen and michael vick are going to be on capitol hill and it has nothing to do
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
years, especially for evan levin over in scotland, what influence was that to what he and norman thought as opposed to what ralph and arthur -- >> sure, it was huge. world war i was unbelievable. i mean, 1.8 million germans, 1.7 million russians, 1.4 million frenchmen. i mean, the death was just astonishing. even in the u.s. u.s. launched about 50,000, but really the fighting only lasted six months. they were losing like a 1020 meant a day. that's just unbelievable. you know, evan, he was over in scotland and then also in london a little bit. you know, he thought and
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
on this issue, and of course, scotland yard has been tainted by this with the top cops in the country now resigning. people are wondering just how far does this scandal, does the corruption go? >> okay, atia shubert joining us live from westminster, many thanks for that, atika will also be on the show later on to give us more insight into what we can expect and what the consequences of what's going to be said today will be. manisha? >> also nina you mentioned earlier how the stock price has been affected. we've been tracking the slump in news corp stock in the wake of the hacking allegations. news corp shares actually closed up by just over 2.5%. in australia today, that reprieve coming after a two-year low on monday and as bloomberg reports that news corp is considering replacing rupert murdoch with coo chase caray. the company dismissed speculation that murdoch may step down. as for news corp's u.s. shares they sank to a six-month low monday dropping another 5% and the company's loss more than $8 billion in market value in the past two weeks alone. july 5th, which was when those allegat
. earlier, fionnuala sweeney spoke with rose gentle in scotland. her son was killed in iraq. >> i'm quite happy that that trsh newspaper is going to be shut down. will he open another paper up? >> reporter: what do you think should be done if these allegations are proven? >> if they're proven, they should go to court. everybody responsible should be put in front of a judge and if they're guilty, they should be sentenced. >> what would you like to say to those responsible? >> i would like to know why they felt they needed to hack my phone when it was concerning my son, i had lost a season. >> the outrage of the "news of the world" phone hacking is likely to be felt by other papers. >> the guardian first broke the news of the illegal hacking by "news of the world." richard quest spoke with michael white, assistant editor of "the guardian" newspaper. he sa >> i think rupert murdoch or james murdoch, his son, who runs the show in this country, has attempted to sacrifice the "news of the world" in order to safe the bskyb bed and to save rebecca brooks. why rebecca brooks? why shouldn't she be
is originally from scotland. >> and there's even a railroad, a harry potter railroad in scotland, now, where you can do a tour on the train, so it's cool. >> reporter: this is the 8th and final film in the harry potter franchise. >> well it's the end of my childhood. that's how i think about it. >> i started reading the book when i was in 2nd grade so this is really like my whole childhood coming to an end. >> reporter: the box office take is simply staggering. $476 million in ticket sales over the weekend around the world. >> it's very adventurous and exciting and, like, i think that it's so cool how they can actually do all the magic. >> reporter: box office magic for the ages. ron max, wjz, "eyewitness news." >>> harry potter:death lee hallows part ii took in more than $40 million in special mid night screenings. it made more than $92 million on friday alone, the biggest single-day take in movie history. >> i'm glad to know i contributed to that with my family. >> the vigils will be really nice with the production effect, huh. >> absolutely. it's a great movie though, and baltimore has got it
years especially for evin who had been over in scotland, what influence he and norman fought as opposed to what ralf and arthur -- >> it was huge. i mean, world war i was just unbelievable. i mean, 1.8 million germans, 1.7 million russians, 1.4 million frenchmen, just the deaf even in the u.s., you know, the u.s. lost about 50,000, but really the fighting only lasted for six months. they were losing 820 men a day. that's just unbelievable. you know, evan was over in scotland, and then also and london a little bit, and she saw what it was like to see men come home without limbs and things like that, and also what it was like to be in london when the bombs were falling, but every man response to violence and every culture responds in different ways, he was actually wounded on the western front and recuperated in these hospitals, but he remained proud of what he had done and father was the right thing until the end of the war she was disillusioned, so i think that and they were well aware of how devastating the violence was but i don't find predictably drove them when we or another. but th
with members of parliament questioning members of scotland yard. but why would they at the end? because murdoch has a business deal pending that is worth billions of dollars and eventually he wants the parliament's cooperation to buy bskyb. so it would jeopardize possibly his buying of that corporation. >> yes, indeed. and it seems that senior police officers wither in the pay of rupert murdoch, so it is possible that rupert murdoch not only seduced the politicians, but also the police? >> well, they were accuse of that today, and senior investigator tos at scotland yard, and they vigorously denied those charge, but they did open up the door on the possibility that police officers at a lower level were paid for news tips, and it does seem as if there is evidence out there that that was a common practice at least that is what is being alleged right now, it was a common practice of "news of the world" and perhaps other publications belonging to rupert murdoch, but investigators today vehemently denying that there was a conspiracy behind their investigation or the fact that their investigation did
's office. >> we are also get, reports scotland yard is beefing up its team of investigators working the case as well. >> reporter: we have always known there is the possibility this investigation could go further. we have now been able to confirm that. the information commission says that they handed over details to the police of another private investigator that was illegally harvesting information and then selling it on to newspapers. newspapers that are not news international newspapers. among the top newspapers, according to the information commission, "the daily mail," "the daily mirror," those are not news international papers and it does seem now that they, too, may be included as part of the ongoing police investigation. one of the inning things is this is not necessarily phone hacking. this could be something called blagging which is impersonating somebody to try to get personal information about them. that is illegal here and also according to the information commission, corruption. this would be mean payouts basically to get that sort of information illegally. the details
. there was a bribery scandal. the head of scotland yard is going to resign. i think they are going to try to bring it to the united states. i don't know that anything has been done here. somebody might have hacked into the 9/11 folks. i don't think the wall street journal had anything to do with that. i don't know that any of that went on here and as of right now, it's still in london. a lot of folks want to bring it here. >> what is your opinion on that, ed? >> other than the potential hacking into the 9/11 victims, i'm not sure pat is wrong on this. he may be right. the one thing we don't want it to become, speaking as a democratic progressive. we don't want it to be a witch hunt on murdock. we don't need that. >> right. >> the story is bad enough on its own. >> andrea, let me invite you in on this. we are expecting testimony from murdock and his son tomorrow. that's going to be a circus-like scene. it's unclear who had connection to all of this. >> i think they all have connections. anyone who has lived or worked there knows. peter you spent a lot of time in london, you know the close connectio
now to the alternative though. but in scotland, the people were like the new members for their default legislators. and the results very between surprising and standing. and wales later celebrated taking outright control of the national assembly. in northern ireland it was a night of trance. robinson retained his job as minister in the most notable results came in scotland. the smb select the challenge of raber one outside control of the parliament, so stargate inevitable thoughts about the referendum when they sued on scottish independence. in between the big u.k. events, huge global event happened in the early hours of the first of may, osama bin laden, probably the best most wanted man was shot dead by americans peschel forces. osama bin laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we
: the police out of scotland yard have been in the crosshairs. amy kellogg is live in london beginning our coverage there. >> reporter: when the murdochs testify they are obliged to answer questions quote by their honor. a lot of people are saying because this meeting before a parliamentary committee and judge-led and police-led inquiries, the panel must prove this is not just a piece of political theater. there has been immense media interest. cameras were out as james murdoch left his home to go to news international offices and snappers chased rupert murdoch as he left his home. they will answer questions for an hour. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter wa
are getting reports this morning scotland yards made an arrest in connection with the news corporation's phone hacking scandal. london's top cop is going to be in the hot seat today. let's bring in dan rivers. he has the latest live in london this morning. good morning, dan. >> reporter: good morning, yeah. another arrest this morning in this police inquiry. we understand that may be a former editor of "the news of the world." that's according to sky news here. he has been arrested this morning, taken into police custody. no comment from the news international themselves. the bigger picture here is there's still confusion about this request for the embamted chi chief. they are all being told to come and report to a committee here on tuesday. the deadline for them to respond is this morning. so far the committee had no response. this is pretty serious stuff. they can't force rupert and james murdoch to appear but they can force rebecca brooks to appear. if she continues to refuse to respond, issue a summons to her, they receiptcally they could send their security apparatus of the house behind m
is the incompetence of scotland yard. the head of scotland yard has left, the deputy to scotland yard has left and the incompetence of london's authorities was very much on display in that hearing room. there are only 50 seats in that room. that's not wembley stadium or yankee stadium. that is a small room. the idea that the authorities there could not keep an assault and that's what this was, an assault, from taking place is just completely outrageous and the people who run parliament security ought to be absolutely ashamed of themselves. >> you mentioned this isn't wembley stadium but the man in custody getting his face wiped by the police looks like he was attending a sporting event. certainly stood out from the suits and the business attire that we saw. we know from our producer in the room that this man came from the back of the room, had a bag, opened up the bag. this all taking place while everybody watched. it seems inconceivable that that could happen. >> you know, all of us in the united states are unhappily used to going through metal detectors, having people check our belongings, b
. the avoidance of any doubt, upon the prime minister state whether this does extend to scotland to? does include the issues such as policing that have involved in -- involved in scotland? has the security -- about his contacts with his international? >> it does end -- it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information -- information commissioners' report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry cut it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations between -- against some offices and the metropolitan police. >> police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong, we should not allow that to undermine the public confidence that people have and the fantastic job they do. >> the prime minister said he was given credible information regarding andy coulson, he would have
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
's coming in. we've got the picture, we make $1 million on the newspaper. >> the top two at scotland yard are now out. this is going to lop don this week -- london this weekend to look at the olympics. in one year from now, the world is coming there and scotland yard is in tatters. >> a lot to go. >> thanks, guys. >>> coming up, somalia is becoming the next target on the war on terror. the investigative reporter for the nation, jeremy skayhill. and chief white house correspondent chuck todd. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. my contacts are so annoying. i can't wait to take 'em out. [ male announcer ] know the feeling? try acuvue® oasys brand contact lenses with hydraclear® plus for exceptional comfort. it feels like it disappeared on my eye! [ male announcer ] discover why it's the brand eye doctors trust most for comfort. acuvue® oasys brand. [ male announcer ] get ready for the left lane. the volkswagen autobahn for all event is back. right now, get a great deal on new volkswagen models, including the cc. and every volkswagen includes scheduled carefree maintenance.
from members of britain's parliament. in this case that now involves scotland yard, very high-level politicians there. >> cbs news correspondent michelle miller has more on the biggest challenge ever to this powerful media mogul. >> it all shows lack of good judgment. >> reporter: for days, ministers in parliament have called for answers from the man rarely forced to answer anyone. now, rupert murdoch must face british lawmakers in a high-stakes effort to defend himself and his media empire. according to a bloomberg report, the 80-year-old ceo is under growing pressure to step down. and may be replaced by current coo chase kerry. >> they're in big trouble. they have criminal investigations that they have to go through. they have parliamentary investigations and they have a lot of shareholders who are really restless. >> reporter: restless because in the two weeks since the phone hacking scandal broke, stock in murdoch's parent company, news corp, has dropped nearly 15%. a loss of an estimated $6 billion. in 30 years, murdoch transformed a single australian newspaper into the w
. this is producing interests facts between murdoch's newspapers and scotland yards. >> the british tabloid schedule and unprecedented day for the owner at the center of it. elizabeth palmer is outside parliament with the latest. >> reporter: as you said, the murdochs have been testifying in front of what is technically a committee on media culture and sport. but i can tell you that the atmosphere around here is much more like a cross between epic drama and an imposition. the set for this drama, the splendor of britain's westminster parliament. the star of the show, media titan rupert murdoch. as investors around the world hanging on his every word and gesture. he is used to giving orders and not answering questions especially from politicians who until recently held him in either awe or terror. >> this is the most humble day of my life. >> reporter: by his side, his son james, the senior executive in the murdoch family empire. >> the company has admitted liability to victims of illegal voice mail interceptions, has apologized unreservedly, which i repeat today, to those victims, and the company als
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)